Tag: Islands

12 Perfect Private Isolated Islands

By MM Travel and Tours in Destinations to Travel

Image courtesy of www.roya-belize.com


Have you decided you actually enjoy being alone? Whether you want to rough it like Robinson Crusoe or lose yourself in the pleasures of a pampering private resort, we have the isle for you. Here then, are 12 perfect private islands perfect for self-isolating.

1. Royal Belize, Dangriga, Belize

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Image © Muy’Ono Resorts

Feel like royalty at Royal Belize. With a price tag of $11,500 per night, this five-star PADI dive resort is designed for only “one booking at a time.” Your stay includes three villas that accommodate 16 people, an island chef, managed staff, and more. You can go kayaking, paddleboarding, or snorkeling. Sign on for some conch diving. Go on an excursion to spear your own lobster and discover what fresh seafood truly is.

2. Fowl Cay, The Exumas, Bahamas

The Fowl Cay resort features only six villas across its full 50 acres. Each villa includes its own golf cart and a small motorboat (complete with a driving lesson). You can swim with the popular swimming pigs and visit Thunderball Grotto, featured in the classic James Bond movie. Go feed wild stingrays and nurse sharks, then kick back at the well-known Staniel Cay Yacht Club, made famous by frequent celeb visitor singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffet.

3. Brother Island, El Nido, Philippines

You can rent this island in El Nido for $350 nightly. Also known as Small Darocotan, the island is surrounded by a natural coral reef. It includes a bamboo forest, preserved jungle, and a beach that reportedly changes its shape each season.  You’ll stay in a building that sleeps 16 people. Since they only handle one booking at a time, the only other humans on the isle are your host, the staff, and a chef.

4. Necker Island, British Virgin Islands, Caribbean

For $102,000 a night you can vacation on the islands like David Beckham, Mariah Carey, Jimmy Fallon, Oprah Winfrey, and Kate Winslet. Mind you, for that kind of money you get the entire island complete with “Beach Olympics”, fitness classes, a floating sushi bar, four different restaurants, spa treatments, tennis, water adventures, and yoga too. You can check out flamingos, giant tortoises, iguanas, and lemurs too. During “celebration weeks”, you can rent a single individual villa.

5. Båtholmen Island, Hvaler, Norway

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Image © Båtholmen

You can rough it a little here in Norway’s archipelago of Hvaler. This 2.5-acre island has a small red cabin that sleeps five people. There’s no running water (although you can get free water at a nearby grocery store prior to your visit). It does include candles, books, games, and an outdoor playhouse. There’s also little private beaches and a small motorboat for fishing. You can cook your food in the garden’s fire pit and barbecue.

6. Urraca Private Island, Punta Laurel, Panama

Image © Urraca Private Island Eco-Lodge

Off the coast of Panama, this private isle has six stilted solar-powered bungalows made of mangroves. This eco-lodge is near the well-known Zapatilla Cays. Animal lovers will simply go ape at the educational Monkey Island Foundation, a special home for orphaned monkeys. You will be looked after by women from the nearby Ngäbe village, and dine on the seasonal fruits and fresh seafood from Ngäbe farmers and fishermen.

7. Pločica Island, Dalmatia, Croatia

image courtesy of adriasoul.com

You can live out your lonely lighthouse keeper fantasies here off the coast of Croatia. Among the 1,185 islands off the coast only four dozen have lighthouses. Built in 1887, the lighthouse here highlights the low, flat terrain. You can relax or read under the shade of numerous fig trees, go diving, swimming, sport fishing and visit the multiple beaches there. At dusk, you can see the nearby lighthouses shining brightly too.

8. Fregate Island Private, Inner Islands, Seychelles

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This secluded paradise has 16 mahogany villas. Enmities include a spa, butler service, a jacuzzi, personal golf carts, powdery white sand beaches, private infinity pools, and a wine cellar. Here you can visit a sanctuary for the Seychelles Magpie Robin and search for Giant Aldabra tortoises with the resort’s naturalist. You can also sign on to spot dolphins and whale sharks or dive into the Indian Ocean and help the locals cultivate coral.

9. Lizard Island, Queensland, Australia

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This is the only resort in Lizard Island National Park. Located on the Great Barrier Reef, it’s beautifully fringed by natural coral and a blue-green lagoon. Explore the two dozen beaches, and go diving. If you’re into nature, go hiking, snorkeling, or go glass-bottom kayaking and see the tropical fish, and giant clam gardens too. Finally, have a spa treatment and relax in one of the 40 villas and suites complete with floor-to-ceiling windows.

10. Song Saa, Koh Rong Archipelago, Cambodia

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The eco-luxury on-the-water and jungle-ensconced villas here were made by local builders with local materials. They feature thatched roofs, linen-draped canopy beds, repurposed furniture, noteworthy decor, and private pools. So stroll hand-in-hand, pause to take in the romantic sunset view then go to dinner. The overwater eatery and casual bar will serve up some local burrata made at the nearby mainland dairy farm.

11. Petit St. Vincent, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

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This 15-acre tropical isle has 22 two-bedroom villas and one-bedroom cottages. There are no telephones, Wi-Fi, or TV. Flags are used to communicate with staff. You can go scuba diving, engage in yoga, and enjoy the Balinese-run luxury spa and wellness center. Dine on the local seafood and award-winning wine at both of the restaurants then have an exotic cocktail at Goatie’s, the beachside bar that comes complete with a memorable view of the pristine waters.

12. Pangkor Laut Resort, Lumut, Perak, Malaysia

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Finally, this luxurious 300-acre island resort is ensconced amidst an olden rainforest and bordered by white sand beaches. Amenities include gardens, jungle trails, swimming pools and romantic little spots to watch the sunset. Much of the island is still raw and undeveloped.

You’ll need to take a four-hour car ride and a 20-minute speedboat ride to reach this spot from the Kuala Lumpur Airport. Famous singer Pavarotti hosted its Spa Village opening in 2002 and you can stay in the suite named for him.

Book your next vacation today through M & M Travel and Tours! (810) 877 1814

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Top 10 Most Dangerous Islands on Earth – Add to Bucketlist , Vacation Deals

By MM Travel and Tours in Destinations to Travel

Most islands are safe as a vacation destination or even a home. However, there are some islands that are not even safe to even go near whether it be because of the residents or a natural occurrence. To help you steer clear of danger, here are the top 10 most dangerous islands on the planet.

1. North Sentinel Island, Andaman Islands

North Sentinel Island is the home of the Sentinelese tribe. This tribe’s only weapons are spears and bows and arrows. The government of India, which controls the island, has deemed them the fiercest group of people on the planet.

Sea travel within five nautical miles is prohibited. The Indian government has also banned anyone from ever going within 3 miles (4.83 kilometers) of its shores. Following a 2000 tsunami, the authorities attempted an emergency food drop, but the mission was aborted after the helicopter was attacked.

2. Ilha de Queimada Grande Island, Brazil

Indiana Jones would not like this place. The island of Ilha de Queimada Grande is also known as Snake Island for a reason. Located off the coast of Brazil, this small isle is only 43 hectares (106+ acres).

Experts estimate that there are approximately five golden lancehead viper snakes per square foot of the island. Lancehead snakes are reported to be responsible for more deaths than any other snake in both North and South America. To date, there’s no known antivenom so avoiding this place is a good idea.

3.Papua, New Guinea

New Guinea is really a nice place to visit, but you sure wouldn’t want to be in Papua. Until 1974 the natives didn’t even know that people from other places weren’t members of rival tribes. These people live their lives in treehouses constructed roughly 140 feet high to avoid being attacked. Those who stumble into their territory are generally met with a rather long barbed arrow pointed at them until they turn themselves around and walk in the other direction. This tribe has a history of cannibalism and may still eat invaders.

4. Gruinard Island, United Kingdom

People are no longer banned from Gruinard Island, but they still stay away from the place. Brit scientists were researching anthrax there in 1942. In the process, they transported 50 sheep to this remote isle off the Scottish mainland.

The sheep were bombed with anthrax. They all died within two weeks. It was not until afterwards that the scientists soon realized they could not remove the anthrax from the soil there. Thus, they put a 50-year ban on the isle. Three Russian aristocrats recently expressed an interest in purchasing it.

5. Saba Island, Netherlands

Saba Island is situated only 20 miles away from St. Martin. Despite that proximity, Saba Island has been trashed by more storms in the past 150 years than any other location on the planet. The statisticians confirm that this place has been hit by no less than seven category five hurricanes and an additional 10 category three hurricanes.

Despite that, the residents of Saba Island continue to welcome travelers to their island. Just be sure to avoid visiting during hurricane season. (Oh! Did we mention place also has one of the world’s most dangerous airports?)

6. Izu Islands, Japan

On the Izu Islands, the ever-present poisonous gases in the air are so strong that residents must carry gas masks with them. The moment the deadly gases rise to a dangerous level a special siren sounds to let everyone know they must immediately put on their gas masks. Scientists are not 100 percent certain but they believe these poisonous gases seep up through the earth and originate from a volcano beneath the island. The residents were evacuated in 2000 and all flights to this destination were canceled for over eight years.

7. Bjornoya, Svalbard, Norway

This would be a hard place to grow enough food to sustain oneself because the land is too rocky. This is a difficult place to even moor a boat due to all the huge cliffs along the coastline. But what makes it dangerous is that a Soviet nuclear submarine sank roughly 100 nautical miles southwest of this spot in 1989 and leaked radioactive material into the water. This may have damaged the island’s soil too. Additionally, experts think that the development of the Snøhvit gas field has also forever altered the climate.

8. Farallon Islands, USA

Some sources claim the USA buried approximately 47,500 55-gallon drums full of nuclear waste on the Farallon Islands not far from San Francisco, California. Government sources state the specific location of all the barrels is unknown but reports that a number of them were buried underwater around the islands. Scientists believe that finding and removing all of these barrels would actually do more damage than leaving them in the ground. What’s worse is that a US Naval ship that could have been radioactive was also buried close to these islands.

9. Bouvet Island, Norway

Bouvet Island is located 1,1000 miles north of Antarctica. It’s the world’s most remote island. More than 93 percent of this 119-square-mile isle is always covered by a glacier.

Only six people live here and they work for the Norwegian Weather Service. They work there for two to four months at a time. In an emergency, help would be slow in arriving as there’s only one reliable place to moor a boat.

10. Mergui Archipelago, Myanmar

The Mergui Archipelago is made up of 800 small islands.
It’s situated between Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand. The islands are largely uninhabited.

The native Moken Tribe survives solely by fishing. They actually live on large wooden boats they consider their homes. Strangers who approach them will be greeted with a hail of fire arrows. Thus, the nearby governments recommend that tourists avoid the area. Sadly, the tribe is now struggling to survive but neither of the local governments is willing to aid them in acclimatizing to our modern society.

So beware! Not all natives are friendly. Not all islands are a paradise.

Book your next vacation today through M & M Travel and Tours! (810) 877 1814

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All content is property of the owner, unless otherwise specified. This content is not owned, or maintained by M & M Travel and Tours, and is used only for informational purposes. Please visit the content owners link via the source link for more information.